Natural First Aid Kit

Here are a few items that I always HAVE TO HAND in my first aid kit, whether its for myself, the dogs or the horses, they are all invaluable, safe and effective.

 

GREEN CLAY : So many uses for green clay and a popular choice in the daily Essentials Range to tackle everything from wounds to hot spots in horses or dogs. It can be used to help slow down or stop bleeding, to dry up hot spots, weeping sores and wet eczema. It also repels flies away from a  wound and used wet as a paste it is excellent for acting as a protective barrier or drawing out heat and infection from a wound or abscess. If the area is very sore it can be sprinkled on with a brush and a layer built up without the need for invasive touching of the area. It also relieves itching , reduces heat and soothes rashes. When used as a paste a drop or two of lavender or oregano essential oil mixed in with help keep infection away.                             

 There is a high quality green clay available in the shop click below on the link: https://www.hedgerowhounds.co.uk/products/green-clay                                       

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Just so versatile, once used you will never want to be without it .

 

COLLOIDAL SILVER: Perfect for cleaning wounds and with the bonus that is does not sting on application. Chose one with a spray application so wounds can be flushed out and any debris removed. It is safe enough to use as an eye or mouth wash and no harm will be done from swallowing it. Unlike some other wound washes, it doesn`t upset the ph balance, so that will please the vets should further treatment be needed such as stitching a wound.  

ARNICA : Another remedy I wouldn't be without is Arnica, both in Homeopathic pill form and either a gel or cream. Fantastic for relieving the pain of bruising and if you and your dog have overexerted yourselves on a particularly strenuous walk or sporting activity. It also aids in a quicker recovery from an operation and to support a patient that is shocked and unsettled after an accident. Topically it is really good for bruising but don't use on broken skin.   

APIS MEL Remedy : Just incase anyone happens to get stung by a bee or a wasp, take as soon as possible to lessen the effects.

HEALING BALM: https://hedgerowhounds.co.uk/products/dog-paw-healing-balm

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Natural Healing Balm to soothe cracked, dry paws, scrapes, grazes and sore skin. Acts as a barrier in wet, muddy conditions.

 

RESCUE REMEDY: This can be a huge help for people or animals  that are going into shock or in a complete panic. A few drops can be put directly into the mouth at the time of the trauma then diluted and taken for ongoing support. There are blends specifically for animals that use glycerine instead of an alcohol base and are often called emergency essence. 

ICE PACK: A portable icepack is useful in your kit should you not have access to ice in the home or you are out walking. The packs that you can pop and they turn very cold can be used as a temporary measure to reduce swelling, bleeding and pain until you can get further assistance.  

ALOE GEL: Very soothing and cooling for minor burns and will offer immediate protection and a barrier for a cut or graze.  

BLANKET : Can be used as a stretcher to carry a dog that is injured or collapsed and also to provide warmth if the patient is going into shock.

TWEEZERS: Can come in useful for removing thorns or small splinters. Do not be tempted to try and remove a thorn or foreign object from the eye instead seek immediate medical/ veterinary attention.  

TICK REMOVING TOOL: It is essential if anyone has been bitten by a tick which is still attached that it is removed quickly and safely . A tool specifically for the job is really the only efficient way and don't be tempted to apply anything to the tick as this causes them to become stressed and empty the contents of their stomach. Instead gently remove with the tool according to the instructions of that particular product. Wipe the area after removal with colloidal silver.  

It goes without saying that none of the above should replace veterinary treatment if it is needed